This entry was written by logicmarselis, posted on 02/09/2013 at 14:43, filed under #magnetik, tributes. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

This entry was written by logicmarselis, posted on 05/17/2012 at 23:22, filed under tributes. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

preme salute.

This entry was written by logicmarselis, posted on 01/03/2012 at 00:34, filed under tributes. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

stay hungry, stay foolish.

we have posted this video before, but posting it again today is only right.

rest in power Steve Jobs.

This entry was written by logicmarselis, posted on 10/05/2011 at 20:47, filed under field of dreams, film, tributes. Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

REST IN BEAUTY

This entry was written by logicmarselis, posted on 05/10/2010 at 01:33, filed under tributes and tagged . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

“Above The Clouds Where The Sounds Are Original Infinite Skills Create Miracles Warrior Spiritual Above The Clouds Raining Down Holdin It Down”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

This entry was written by logicmarselis, posted on 04/22/2010 at 02:53, filed under tributes and tagged . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

الحاجّ مالك الشباز

                               spotted at The Beautiful Struggle

This entry was written by logicmarselis, posted on 02/21/2010 at 23:28, filed under tributes and tagged . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

RestInPower.

May 30, 1974 – February 15, 1999

This entry was written by logicmarselis, posted on 02/15/2010 at 17:20, filed under tributes and tagged , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

Rest In Beats.

This entry was written by logicmarselis, posted on 02/10/2010 at 00:07, filed under tributes and tagged . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

StillDreaming.

January 15, 1929

Martin Luther King Jr. is born. Though his work for civil rights and peace will become widely known, he will also deliver an important warning on the perils of technological amorality.

King delivered a lecture at the University of Oslo, Norway, on Dec. 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. He argued that progress in science and technology has not been equaled by “moral progress” — instead, humanity is suffering from a “moral and spiritual lag.”

At 35, King was then the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He was recognized for using nonviolent methods, including civil disobedience and the boycott (as well as the power of his oratory), to fight racial segregation and advance the civil rights movement in the United States.

King, a Baptist minister who was the son of a Baptist minister, preached that material advancement was meaningless without an accompanying moral structure. A visit with Mahatma Gandhi’s family on a trip to India only reinforced this conviction, while at the same time strengthening King’s commitment to nonviolence as an instrument of change.

In his Oslo lecture, King acknowledged the advances made by science and technology, but said that growing abundance was undermining the human spirit.

The richer we have become materially, the poorer we become morally and spiritually,” he said. “We have learned to fly in the air like birds and swim in the sea like fish, but we have not learned the simple art of living together as brothers.”

Placing too much value on material advantage while ignoring what he called the “spiritual lag” was a path fraught with peril, King said.

“Enlarged material powers spell enlarged peril if there is not proportionate growth of the soul. When the ‘without’ of man’s nature subjugates the ‘within,’ dark storm clouds begin to form in the world.”

King was killed by a sniper’s bullet on April 4, 1968, as he stood on a motel balcony in Memphis, Tennessee. He had gone there to lend support to striking city garbage workers.

source: wired

[youtube=

This entry was written by logicmarselis, posted on 01/15/2010 at 20:23, filed under tributes and tagged , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

Arthur Ashe

Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr. (July 10, 1943 – February 6, 1993) was a professional tennis player, born and raised in Richmond, Virginia. During his career, he won three Grand Slam titles, putting him among the best ever from the U.S. Ashe, an African American, is also remembered for his efforts to further social causes.

Ashe was coached by Ronald Charity, and later coached by Walter Johnson. Tired of having to travel great distances to play caucasian youths in segregated Richmond, Virginia, Ashe accepted an offer from a Saint Louis, Missouri tennis official to move there and attend Sumner High School. Young Ashe was recognized by Sports Illustrated for his playing.

Ashe was awarded a tennis scholarship to the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in 1963. That same year, Ashe became the first African American ever selected to the United States Davis Cup team.

In 1965, Ashe won the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) singles title and contributed to UCLA’s winning the team NCAA tennis championship. While at UCLA, Ashe was initiated as a member of the Upsilon chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity.

In 1968, Ashe won the United States Amateur Championships and the inaugural US Open and aided the U.S Davis Cup team to victory. He is the only player to have won both of these amateur and open national championships in the same year. Concerned that tennis professionals were not receiving winnings commensurate with the sport’s growing popularity, Ashe supported formation of the Association of Tennis Professionals. That year would prove even more momentous for Ashe when he was denied a visa by the South African government, thereby keeping him out of the South African Open. Ashe used this denial to publicize South Africa’s apartheid policies. In the media, Ashe called for South Africa to be expelled from the professional tennis circuit.

In 1969, Ashe turned professional. In 1970, Ashe won his second Grand Slam singles title at the Australian Open.

In 1975, Ashe won Wimbledon, unexpectedly defeating Jimmy Connors in the final. He played for several more years, but after being slowed by heart surgery in 1979, Ashe retired in 1980.

Arthur, the first African-American male to win a Grand Slam event, was an active civil rights supporter. He was a member of a delegation of 31 prominent African-Americans who visited South Africa to observe political change in the country as it approached racial integration.

He was arrested on January 11, 1985, for protesting outside the South African embassy in Washington, D.C. during an anti-apartheid rally. He was also arrested again on September 9, 1992, outside the White House for protesting on the recent crackdown on Haitian refugees.

This entry was written by logicmarselis, posted on 07/02/2009 at 14:26, filed under tributes and tagged , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.

Lego Inaugaration Day

This entry was written by logicmarselis, posted on 01/22/2009 at 01:03, filed under Art, tributes and tagged , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink.